Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of vitamin B12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Before taking DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are taking ampicillin, atazanavir, erlotinib, digoxin, product containing iron, ketoconazole, tacrolimus, methotrexate, or mycophenolate mofetil. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch
or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Get savings
and a whole
lot more!

Most commercially insured patients pay
no more than $20.*

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Low occurrence
of side effects

The most common side effects were diarrhea, stomach pain, nausea, common cold, vomiting, and gas.

Frequently Asked Questions

About the name change

Why did the KAPIDEX (dexlansoprazole) name change to DEXILANT?

Occasionally, when medicines have similar sounding names, confusion can occur when a prescription is dispensed. In order to minimize possible confusion, Takeda, in coordination with the US Food and Drug Administration, changed the name KAPIDEX (dexlansoprazole) to DEXILANT in April 2010. DEXILANT is the same medication as KAPIDEX. Only the name has changed. Takeda is dedicated to patient safety.

Information on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)

What is gastroesophageal reflux disease?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs when stomach acid used for digestion repeatedly backs up, or refluxes, into the esophagus. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is also known as GERD. See Living With GERD to learn more.

How do I know if I have GERD?

Heartburn is the most common symptom of GERD. Occasional heartburn can typically be relieved with over-the-counter medications if needed. If you have persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, it could be more than just heartburn. It could be GERD. Only your doctor can diagnose GERD. See Living With GERD for more details.

Can I have GERD and not have heartburn?

Yes. Although heartburn is the most common symptom, many other symptoms are also associated with GERD.

What are the symptoms of GERD?

GERD affects different people in many different ways. Persistent heartburn is the most common symptom, but other possible GERD symptoms include:

  • Persistent heartburn

  • Stomach acid rising

  • Sour taste in the mouth

  • Burning in the throat

  • Pain or burning in the chest

  • Burping

Do the same foods trigger heartburn in everyone?

No. Foods and beverages affect people differently, so learning which foods bother you is an important way to manage your condition. Continuing to avoid foods that trigger your heartburn and eating frequent small meals are two changes that can help reduce symptoms of GERD.

What damage can occur with GERD?

The lining of your esophagus can be damaged. However, the disease is complex and has many degrees of severity, ranging from just symptoms to erosions in your esophagus (erosive esophagitis).

What is erosive esophagitis?

Erosive esophagitis is a more severe form of GERD in which the lining of your esophagus has been eroded away or damaged by continued exposure to acid. Fortunately, erosive esophagitis can be treated. Talk to your doctor about healing erosive esophagitis.

Treating heartburn related to gastroesophageal reflux disease

What are the treatment options for heartburn related to GERD?

There are many treatment options for heartburn related to GERD. Talk to your doctor about which GERD treatment might work best for you.

These are some of the most common ways GERD is treated:

Antacids

These are available without a prescription (over the counter, or "OTC") and used primarily for heartburn. Typically, they can provide temporary relief of symptoms, although this is limited for some people.

H2 blockers

These are available over the counter and by prescription. If you continue to suffer from heartburn, you should see your doctor. Your doctor may develop a different treatment plan.

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)

Most PPIs—like DEXILANT—are available only by prescription. They block the final stage of acid production and are very effective at relieving heartburn in many people who have GERD.

Click here to learn more about a treatment option that can help you manage heartburn related to GERD.

What should I ask my doctor?

See the Talking With Your Doctor checklist for a guide to questions and topics to discuss when you meet with your doctor.

Will GERD go away on its own?

GERD is often a chronic condition, but its symptoms can be managed. That is why it's important to talk to your doctor about GERD treatment options. Over time, GERD can lead to serious complications.

How DEXILANT works

What is the generic name for DEXILANT?

DEXILANT is also known as dexlansoprazole (dex-lan-SOPP-rah-zall). Dexlansoprazole decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. It is used in adults for the treatment of heartburn related to GERD, healing acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and keeping EE from coming back with continued treatment as prescribed. Individual results may vary.

Does DEXILANT block all acid production in my stomach?

No. Stomach acid is needed for digestion, so DEXILANT blocks many (but not all) of the tiny pumps that produce acid in the stomach. Learn more about how DEXILANT works.

How does DEXILANT help heal erosions of the esophagus?

DEXILANT works by reducing the amount of acid in your stomach. Therefore, you have less harmful acid backing up, or refluxing, into your esophagus. This allows your esophagus to heal. With DEXILANT, you can go beyond relieving your everyday symptoms. As long as you are taking DEXILANT as prescribed, you can continue to heal the damage to your esophagus caused by GERD. Individual results may vary. See How DEXILANT Works for more details on the effectiveness of DEXILANT.

How does DEXILANT stop the damage to my esophagus from coming back?

If a maintenance regimen for healing of erosive esophagitis is prescribed and followed, DEXILANT, once a day, helps to reduce stomach acid. As a result, less acid backs up, or refluxes, into your esophagus. This helps stop the damage to your esophagus from coming back. Individual results
may vary.

Does DEXILANT have side effects?

Studies of more than 4500 people showed that DEXILANT had a low occurrence of side effects. The most common were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). These were seen in less than 5% of patients. For more information, please see the page on Safety and the Important Safety Information below.

How to take DEXILANT

How do I take DEXILANT?

Both DEXILANT doses (30 mg and 60 mg) are available in capsule form. Unlike some medicines, which should be taken on an empty stomach, you can take DEXILANT with or without food. Capsules should be swallowed whole. If you have trouble swallowing DEXILANT capsules whole, you can open the capsules and sprinkle the contents on a tablespoon of applesauce. Be sure to swallow the applesauce mixture right away. Do not chew the mixture and do not store it for later use. As with other medications, be sure to take DEXILANT exactly as it was prescribed and for the full length of time. For more information, see the page on Safety and the complete Prescribing Information.

How long should I take DEXILANT?

How long you take DEXILANT will depend on why you're taking it and how your body responds. Only your doctor can tell you how long you should take DEXILANT. While individual results may vary, DEXILANT not only relieves the heartburn symptoms associated with GERD, but it also can help heal damage to the esophagus known as erosive esophagitis. And for many people, continuing treatment with DEXILANT, if prescribed, can even keep the damage from coming back. For this reason, it's important to take your medicine as directed by your doctor even if you don't feel the symptoms. You may feel better before you run out of capsules.

About the DEXILANT Advantage Program

How do I register for the DEXILANT Advantage Program?

You can register for the DEXILANT Advantage Program here. If you are having trouble signing up online, you can also call 1-866-279-5598
to register.

What are the benefits of enrolling in the DEXILANT Advantage Program?

The DEXILANT Advantage Program includes several beneficial features designed to save you time and money:

  1. An Instant Savings Card that lets most commercially insured patients pay no more than $20* for their DEXILANT prescriptions, and can be used with each refill!

  2. Uninsured patients can save up to $55 off their prescription and each refill of DEXILANT.

  3. An automatic refill reminder designed to help eliminate the hassle of remembering when to refill your DEXILANT prescription by sending you emails before or after your refill date.

  4. A variety of useful tips, tools, and resources to help you manage your heartburn and other gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms.

  5. A handy Medication Manager that helps keep track of all of your prescriptions and when they're about due to be refilled.

  6. Text alerts delivered right to your mobile device so you can stay current with your prescription of DEXILANT.

Am I eligible for the DEXILANT Instant Savings Card?

The DEXILANT Instant Savings Card cannot be used if any part of your prescription is covered by: (1) any federal or state healthcare program (Medicare, Medicaid, TriCARE, etc.), including a state pharmaceutical assistance program, (2) the Medicare Prescription Drug Program (Part D), or if you are currently in the coverage gap, or (3) insurance that is paying the entire cost of the prescription.

My DEXILANT Instant Savings Card has expired. What do I do?

To receive a new card, just log in to My Account and follow the instructions to download and print your brand-new card. Then take your new card to the pharmacy when you refill your prescription of DEXILANT. You will also continue to receive all of the other DEXILANT Advantage Program benefits that you've always enjoyed. For more information about the DEXILANT Advantage Program or the Instant Savings Card, call 1-866-279-5598.

If I am ineligible to receive the Instant Savings Card, can I still receive the tools, tips, refill reminders, and other information about DEXILANT?

Yes. If you are ineligible for the Instant Savings Card or you do not want to participate in the program, you can still get information about DEXILANT, as well as tips, tools, and refill reminders to help make managing your heartburn easier.

I have general questions about the DEXILANT Advantage Program. Whom do I contact?

For general information on the DEXILANT Advantage Program,
call 1-866-279-5598.

Are there any assistance programs available to help me get DEXILANT?

Help At Hand is a program designed to provide options for receiving free or low-cost medicines. Find out if Help At Hand has an option for you.

Using your DEXILANT Instant Savings Card

How do I use my DEXILANT Instant Savings Card?

Take your prescription for DEXILANT and your Instant Savings Card to your pharmacist. Most commercially insured patients pay no more than $20* for each prescription. Remember, your card is not a coupon, so be sure to bring it with you to the pharmacy to receive instant savings every time you fill or refill your prescription.

I registered for the DEXILANT Advantage Program and received my Instant Savings Card online. Will I also get a permanent card?

Yes. Once you use the card you received online, we'll mail you a permanent DEXILANT Instant Savings Card to use each time you fill your prescription for DEXILANT.

I registered for the DEXILANT Advantage Program, but I did not receive my Instant Savings Card online. What do I do?

Please call 1-866-279-5598. You will then receive a DEXILANT Instant Savings Card by U.S. Mail. It should arrive in 2–3 weeks.

I have not received my permanent Instant Savings Card. How do I find out if it was sent to me?

Your permanent Instant Savings Card should arrive via U.S. Mail 2–3 weeks after you use the card you received online. If you have not received your card and it has been longer than three weeks, please call 1-866-279-5598 to check the status.

How do I activate and use the Instant Savings Card that I received online?

Once you sign up for the DEXILANT Advantage Program, you will receive a personalized Instant Savings Card online. You can print the Instant Savings Card and use it right away. You do not need to activate the card before using it.

How do I activate and use the Instant Savings Card that I got from
a brochure?

To activate the card that you received from a brochure, visit DAPactivate.com or call the number located on your card. You will be asked for the Member Number on the card.

I'm having trouble activating my Instant Savings Card online.

Please wait a few minutes, then try to activate your DEXILANT Instant Savings Card again. If you are still experiencing problems, please call the number on the front of your card to activate it.

I lost my Instant Savings Card and the letter it came on. How do I get a
new one?

To replace lost or stolen cards or a misplaced letter, call 1-866-279-5598.

What should I do if the pharmacy can't process my Instant Savings Card?

If the pharmacy has difficulty processing your card, have the pharmacy follow the steps on the back of your Instant Savings Card. The pharmacy can also call the number located on your card for processing questions.

My pharmacist couldn't process my card or doesn't accept the card, and I have already paid for my prescription. Can I still receive the instant savings?

If you have already paid for your prescription, please visit www.patientrebateonline.com and follow the instructions. If you need further information, call 1-866-279-5598.

I have an Instant Savings Card, but I get my prescriptions via mail order. Can I still get the discount? What forms do I need?

Yes. Please visit www.patientrebateonline.com and follow the instructions. If you need further information, call 1-866-279-5598.

I've already paid for my prescription of DEXILANT. Is there a mail-in rebate available?

Patient mail-in rebate forms and information on how to complete and submit them are available at www.patientrebateonline.com. You may also request one by calling 1-866-279-5598.

About DEXILANT.com

What do you do with my private information?

Takeda Pharmaceuticals, the company that brings you DEXILANT, respects your right to have personal and medical information kept confidential. Only Takeda and companies working on behalf of Takeda will use the information you provide. It will not be shared with any other third parties. Please review our privacy policy for more information.

How do I change my information, like an incorrect name, changed name, or a changed address?

You can change personal information on the My Account page. You can also call 1-866-279-5598.

I have questions about Takeda Pharmaceuticals. Whom do I contact?

If you have general questions about Takeda Pharmaceuticals, visit the Takeda corporate website.

Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of vitamin B12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Before taking DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are taking ampicillin, atazanavir, erlotinib, digoxin, product containing iron, ketoconazole, tacrolimus, methotrexate, or mycophenolate mofetil. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

Uses of DEXILANT

Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Individual results may vary. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

*Must meet Eligibility Requirements. This savings card covers out-of-pocket expenses greater than $20, up to a maximum benefit of $55 for a 30-day prescription or $165 for a commercially insured 90-day prescription.