Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch
or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Get savings
and a whole
lot more!

Most commercially insured patients pay
no more than $20.*

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How DEXILANT
is DIFFERENT

DEXILANT is the only GERD treatment with two releases of medicine in one pill.

Low occurrence
of side effects

The most common side effects were diarrhea, stomach pain, nausea, common cold, vomiting, and gas.

What is GERD anyway?
And what’s it got to do with heartburn?

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid used for digestion repeatedly backs up, or refluxes, into the esophagus. GERD is also known as acid reflux disease. Heartburn, often described as pain or burning in the chest, is a common symptom of GERD.

What causes Gerd?

When you eat, millions of tiny pumps in your stomach produce the acid that helps you digest food.

A valve called the LES (lower esophageal sphincter)— opens between your esophagus and stomach to allow food and liquids to enter the stomach.

If the valve doesn't close all the way, or if it opens too often, stomach acid can move up into your esophagus and cause these symptoms:

  • Persistent heartburn

  • Stomach acid rising

  • Sour taste in the mouth

  • Burning in the throat

  • Pain or burning in the chest

  • Burping

With continued exposure to stomach acid, the esophagus may become irritated and possibly even damaged, a condition known as erosive esophagitis.

Can GERD be a chronic disease?

Since heartburn and other symptoms of GERD affect different people in different ways, it's important to talk to your doctor. Only your doctor can diagnose GERD and determine if there is any damage (erosions) to your esophagus.

Concerned about your heartburn related to GERD?
Talk to your doctor.

Help take control and see your doctor for a diagnosis, treatment options, and the best ways to manage your condition.

Start the conversation with this checklist.

Answer these questions about your symptoms,
print the results, and share them with your doctor.

1. I have heartburn or GERD symptoms days a week

2. I have been experiencing these symptoms for:

3. I would describe my symptoms as:

4. I usually have heartburn:

5. I experience nighttime heartburn:

6. I currently treat my heartburn with:

7. I treat my heartburn with a prescription and still experience symptoms:

8. I am currently taking other medications, including Plavix (clopidogrel):

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Make managing your GERD easier

You can start taking control of your GERD symptoms with these
simple tips. They can help make a difference.

  • Avoid these potential trigger foods:

    • Chocolate

    • Fried and fatty foods

    • Peppermint and spearmint

    • Tomato-based foods

    • Coffee and other caffeinated drinks

    • Spicy foods

    • Onions

    • Citrus fruits

    • Alcohol

  • Eat small, frequent meals

  • Avoid eating 2–3 hours before bedtime

  • If you currently smoke, try to quit

  • Elevate the head of the bed

Tools you can use to help fight heartburn

Tracking symptoms. Keeping current with refills as directed by your doctor. Remembering to take your medication. They're all important parts of managing GERD effectively. And these handy tools can help. Be sure to sign up for the DEXILANT Advantage Program for full access.

Important Safety Information

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. The most common side effects of DEXILANT were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

Uses of DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules

Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks. Individual results may vary.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

*Must meet Eligibility Requirements. This savings card covers out-of-pocket expenses greater than $20, up to a maximum benefit of $55 for a 30-day prescription or $165 for a commercially insured 90-day prescription.