Glossary

Disease Education Terms

A

Antacid
Medication that helps lower the amount of stomach acid.

D

Deficiency
Lacking substances necessary to health.

E

Erosive Esophagitis
A condition that occurs when the esophagus is injured over time by acid irritation and inflammation.

Esophagus
A muscular tube that connects the throat with the stomach. It carries food and liquid from the mouth to the stomach.

F

Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
The US federal agency responsible for protecting the public health by ensuring safety, efficacy and security of products such as drugs, medical devices, food and cosmetics.

G

Gastroesophageal
A term relating to both the stomach and esophagus.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
A condition that occurs when stomach acid frequently (2 or more times a week) flows back into the esophagus (the tube connecting your throat and stomach). This can irritate your esophagus and cause heartburn and other symptoms.

Generic name
A term referring to the chemical name of a drug rather than to the advertised brand name under which the drug is sold.

H

H2 blockers
Medications that can be used to treat conditions that cause excess stomach acid. These medications lower the amount of acid in the stomach released by glands in the lining of the stomach.

Health Care Provider (HCP)
A general term for any health care institution or member providing health care such as doctors, nurses, pharmacists, etc.

Heartburn
An uncomfortable burning feeling in your chest that can move up your neck and throat. This can be a symptom of many different conditions, including acid reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Hepatic
Relating to the liver.

I

Indigestion
Being unable to digest or having trouble digesting, often marked by a burning sensation or discomfort in the upper abdomen.

L

Lower Esophageal Sphincter (LES)
A bundle of muscles at the low end of the esophagus, where it meets the stomach. When the LES is closed, it prevents acid and stomach contents from flowing backwards from the stomach.

Lupus Erythematosus
A recurring disease that causes inflammation in connective tissues. Some people who take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may develop lupus erythematosus. For those who already have it, they may see their symptoms worsen.

P

Polyp
A general term used to describe a growth of tissue that bulges outward or upward from a normal surface.

Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)
A type of medication that can be used to lower the amount of stomach acid, relieving GERD symptoms and allowing the damaged tissue of the esophagus time to heal.

R

Reflux
A backward flow.

Savings And Support Terms

E

Eligibility
Meeting a set of standards in place to qualify for something. For example, if you are financially eligible, it means you meet a set of standards relating to your income that qualify you for support.

R

Retroactive
Taking effect from a date in the past. In the case of withdrawing permission, it cannot be backdated.

Important Safety Information

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DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. 

Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. 

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone.

Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine.

Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions.

A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine.

DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away.

People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine.

Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun.

Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years).

Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine for at least 3 months.

People who take PPI medicines for a long time (especially more than 1 year) have an increased risk of developing a certain type of stomach growth called fundic gland polyps.

DEXILANT is not recommended in children under 2 years of age and may harm them.

The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%).

The most common side effects in children 12 to 17 years of age were headache, stomach pain, diarrhea, and pain or swelling (inflammation) in your mouth, nose or throat.

Before starting DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other.

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules

Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in children age 12 to 17 years for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 16 weeks to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. It is not known if DEXILANT is safe and effective in children under age 12 years. DEXILANT is not effective for symptoms of GERD in children under 1 year of age.

In adults, persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be GERD, also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus, and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4 to 8 weeks.

Individual results may vary.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.