Real people. Real stories.

Carl and Melissa know the pain of heartburn related to GERD, too. So their doctors prescribed DEXILANT. Click on their pictures and watch their videos to hear their stories.

Individual results may vary.

Watch Carl's Story

Video Transcript

CARL: Hi, I’m Carl. My wife, Sharolyn, and I live in Arlington, Texas. We’ve been married 53 years—we have 4 kids, 12 grandkids, all scattered around the country. For work, I’m a litigation specialist, I focus on bank and computer fraud. It keeps me pretty busy these days—some might even call me a workaholic! I started out by building computers, just for fun. And then one day my hobby became my job. I’m pretty active in our church, so when I’m not working, I’m usually doing something related to that. I teach classes there in the summer. I’m also vice president of the conference board of trustees. Other than that—I just like to spend time with my family.

I’ve had heartburn symptoms for many years. It was painful, but I think I have a high tolerance for pain. It was that acid taste in my mouth that was just awful. It was bad during the day, it was bad at night. And it always tasted like what I’d just eaten—acid with roast beef, acid with beets, you name it. Not pleasant at all.

SUPER: Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD).

CARL: I took antacids. I put them everywhere in case I needed them—in the drawers in the kitchen, in the glove box of the car. I was afraid to go anywhere without them. They helped a little bit but they didn’t stop the problem.

I was pretty miserable for a long time and my wife worried about me a lot. When I told my doctor my story, he sent me to a gastroenterologist. The doctor did a scope and said I had acid reflux disease and damage to my esophagus. So he gave me a prescription for DEXILANT.

SUPER: DEXILANT capsules heal damage (erosions) to the esophagus and keeps it from coming back. Individual results may vary.

CARL: And I like it—I don’t have to worry about what time of day I take it, but I usually take it just before supper so I remember.

SUPER: Capsules should be swallowed whole. If you have trouble swallowing DEXILANT capsules whole, you can open the capsules and sprinkle the contents on a tablespoon of applesauce.

CARL: My doctor did another scope and said my esophagus still has a little damage but that it’s showing signs of healing.

SUPER: Be sure to swallow the applesauce mixture right away. Do not chew the mixture and do not store the mixture for later use.

CARL: And I feel it—my heartburn is more manageable now, and I feel good, day and night. My wife doesn’t worry about my heartburn symptoms anymore.

SUPER: Individual results may vary.

CARL: I tell her that if we had to choose between gas for the car or paying for my DEXILANT, we’d have to learn to walk.

Fortunately, we don’t have to choose, though. I did a little research and found an instant savings card on DEXILANT.com, so I use that when I go in for my prescription.

SUPER: Must meet Eligibility Requirements.

CARL: I signed up for the DEXILANT Patient Program and it sends me emails to remind me when my prescriptions are about due to be refilled. I can’t ever remember the date I need to pick them up, so I find that very helpful.

DEXILANT has helped me a lot, and I’m very happy my doctor told me about it.

SUPER: Individual results may vary.

VOICEOVER AND SUPER: Uses of DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules. Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks. Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information. DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine. DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away.

People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. People who take PPI medicines for a long time (especially more than 1 year) have an increased risk of developing a certain type of stomach growth called fundic gland polyps.

The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). Before starting DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, for DEXILANT. The link to the Prescribing Information can be found at the top of this page.

Watch Melissa's Story

Video Transcript

MELISSA: My name is Melissa and I’m from Merrimack, New Hampshire… I have a boyfriend. His name is Jimmy. We are very outdoorsy people. We love being outside in the woods. Our winters here in New Hampshire are wicked cold and we get a lot of snow but we have snowmobiles that we love taking out all the time. It’s a blast. I love it here. I am an assistant at a medical office. I do everything from answering phones to blood draws to assisting with minor surgical procedures. It’s crazy and it’s stressful at times but I love it.

I noticed my heartburn about five to six years ago. I was trying to do things on my own: over the counter antacids, diet changes, lifestyle changes, exercise.

SUPER: Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD).

MELISSA: I quit smoking. But the heartburn just came back. I even gave up the foods I love. I love pasta and I had to give it up just to get some relief. The heartburn was wicked bad. I couldn’t handle it, especially at night. It would keep me up all night. I tried different positions: my back, my stomach, side and nothing worked. I just—it was getting aggravating. I’d have to get up in the middle of the night, again, to take more antacids just to get some relief. The antacids helped a bit but after a while it would come back. So it was a vicious cycle.

I went to my healthcare provider and told her my symptoms…and she diagnosed me with acid reflux disease. Then she had me try DEXILANT. It’s once a day. I take it with breakfast. It’s very convenient with my schedule.

SUPER: Capsules should be swallowed whole. If you have trouble swallowing DEXILANT capsules whole, you can open the capsules and sprinkle the contents on a tablespoon of applesauce.

MELISSA: …I would recommend DEXILANT to other people. I think they should go speak to their healthcare provider…

SUPER: Be sure to swallow the applesauce mixture right away. Do not chew the mixture and do not store the mixture for later use.

MELISSA: …about their acid reflux disease and see if DEXILANT can be an option for them. DEXILANT really worked for me.

SUPER: Individual results may vary.

VOICEOVER AND SUPER: Uses of DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules. Persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks. Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information. DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine. DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away.

People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. People who take PPI medicines for a long time (especially more than 1 year) have an increased risk of developing a certain type of stomach growth called fundic gland polyps.

The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). Before starting DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide, for DEXILANT. The link to the Prescribing Information can be found at the top of this page.

Get to know Melissa

GET TO KNOW MELISSA

The winters in her native New Hampshire may get "wicked cold," but Melissa takes advantage of the weather by snowmobiling as often as she can. She had heartburn for a long time before her healthcare provider diagnosed her with GERD and prescribed DEXILANT.

Watch Melissa's video.

See how DEXILANT works in this video

Important Safety Information

SEE MORE + CLOSE -
DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported.

DEXILANT may not be right for everyone. Do not take DEXILANT if you are allergic to DEXILANT or any of its ingredients or taking a medicine that contains rilpivirine. Serious allergic reactions have been reported. Tell your doctor if you get any of the following symptoms with DEXILANT: rash, face swelling, throat tightness, or difficulty breathing. Symptom relief does not rule out other serious stomach conditions. A type of kidney problem called acute interstitial nephritis may develop at any time during treatment with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medicines, including DEXILANT. Call your doctor right away if you have a decrease in the amount that you urinate or if you have blood in your urine. DEXILANT may increase your risk of getting severe diarrhea. Call your doctor right away if you have watery stool, stomach pain, and fever that does not go away. People who are taking multiple daily doses of PPI medicines for a long period of time (a year or longer) may have an increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, or spine. Some people who take PPIs may develop new or worsening of certain types of lupus erythematosus. Call your doctor right away if you have joint pain or rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse in the sun. Talk with your doctor about the possibility of Vitamin B-12 deficiency if you have been on DEXILANT for a long time (more than 3 years). Low magnesium levels can happen in some people who take a PPI medicine. People who take PPI medicines for a long time (especially more than 1 year) have an increased risk of developing a certain type of stomach growth called fundic gland polyps. The most common side effects of DEXILANT in adults were diarrhea (4.8%), stomach pain (4.0%), nausea (2.9%), common cold (1.9%), vomiting (1.6%), and gas (1.6%). The most common side effects in children 12 to 17 years of age were headache, stomach pain, diarrhea, and pain or swelling (inflammation) in your mouth, nose or throat. Before starting DEXILANT, tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. DEXILANT and certain other medicines can affect each other. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Tell your doctor if you are taking methotrexate, rilpivirine, atazanavir, nelfinavir, saquinavir, digoxin, product containing iron, erlotinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, mycophenolate mofetil, ketoconazole/itraconazole, tacrolimus, St. John’s Wort or rifampin. If you are taking DEXILANT with warfarin, you may need to be monitored because serious risks could occur.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

DEXILANT (dexlansoprazole) 30 mg and 60 mg delayed-release capsules

Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in children age 12 to 17 years for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus (called erosive esophagitis or EE), and for up to 16 weeks to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. It is not known if DEXILANT is safe and effective in children under age 12 years. DEXILANT is not effective for symptoms of GERD in children under 1 year of age.

In adults, persistent heartburn two or more days a week, despite treatment and diet changes, could be gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), also known as acid reflux disease (ARD). Prescription DEXILANT capsules are used in adults for 4 weeks to treat heartburn related to GERD, for up to 8 weeks to heal acid-related damage to the lining of the esophagus, and for up to 6 months to continue healing of EE and relief of heartburn. Most damage (erosions) heals in 4–8 weeks.

Individual results may vary.

Talk to your doctor or healthcare professional. Please see full Prescribing Information, including Medication Guide for DEXILANT.